How to Make Your Resume Attractive to Recruiters, with Taranum Khan

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Find Your Dream Job, Episode 152:

How to Make Your Resume Attractive to Recruiters, with Taranum Khan

Airdate: August 15, 2018

Mac Prichard:

Hi, this is Mac of Mac’s List. Find Your Dream Job is presented by Mac’s List, an online community where you can find free resources for your job search, plus online courses and books that help you advance your career. My latest book is called Land Your Dream Job Anywhere. It’s a reference guide for your career that covers all aspects of the job search, including expert advice in every chapter. You can get the first chapter for free by visiting macslist.org/anywhere.

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac’s List. I’m joined by my co-hosts, Leila O’Hara and Jessica Black, from the Mac’s List team.

This week we’re talking about how to make your resume attractive to recruiters.

We’re recording this episode in 2018 when the national unemployment rate in the United States has reached record lows. But even today, employers receive several dozen resumes for many job openings. Our guest expert this week is Taranum Kahn. She says can make your resume stand out in a stack of applications. Taranum and I talk later in the show about how to do this.

Many of us set unrealistic expectations for ourselves and that can hurt a job search. Leila has found a list of eight common unrealistic expectations that smart job seekers ignore. She tells us more in a moment.

Does this ever happen to you? You upload your resume as part of an online job application. Then you enter content in your resume into the application’s work history fields. Why do employers do this? That’s our question of the week. It comes from listener Terry Williamson in Eugene, Oregon. Jessica shares her advice shortly.

As always, let’s check in with the Mac’s List team.

Every week, Leila, you’re out there, poking around the Internet, looking through those nooks and crannies for the tools,books, and websites listeners can use in a job search. What have you uncovered for our listeners this week, Leila?

Leila O’Hara:

This week I wanted to share an article I found about expectations.

Expectations can help you frame your perspective for a situation. Let’s say you’re sitting in a coffee shop before you meet a hiring manager for an interview. If you give yourself a little pep talk and have positive expectations that the interview is going to go well, that can give you an added boost of confidence.On the other hand, if you have unrealistic or incorrect expectations, they can lead to disappointment, failure, or change the outcome of a situation.

The Ladders shared 8 unrealistic expectations that smart people ignore. Many of these expectations are ones I’ve personally encountered in my job search. If you’re not careful, these are tricky mental traps that can hamper your success. I wanted to share 3 of my favorites from the article that I think are especially relevant for job seekers.

The first is the impression that “opportunities are going to fall into my lap.” If you have a huge network, a great resume, or an incredible cover letter, you may fall into the trap of thinking that your dream job is going to appear magically before you. But the reality is, just because you’re deserving of great opportunities, that doesn’t mean they’re automatically going to come your way. You have to go out and make it happen.

The second is an expectation that I think every perfectionist will recognize. It is the expectation that,  “Everyone should like me.” If you’re a people-pleaser like me, you may want every hiring manager you meet to like everything about you. But this can be your own downfall because you end up feeling hurt when in reality, you can’t win everyone over. Instead of letting this hurt your confidence, turn your doubts and criticisms into an opportunity to focus on gaining everyone’s respect and trust.

The third one is crucial for every job seeker to either ignore or overcome, which is the expectation that “I’m going to fail.” If you go into every job interview expecting to fail, you’re more likely to create the outcome that you’re most afraid of. Success and failure go hand in hand, but it’s key to give yourself confidence and believe that you’re going to succeed no matter what, regardless of your fears or doubts. That can be the difference at the end of the day between an awkward interview or an email that says “You’re hired!”

Mac Prichard:

That’s a good list.

Jessica Black:

Yeah.

Leila O’Hara:

Thanks, yeah, I thought those were all really insightful.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, well, what are your thoughts Jessica?

Jessica Black:

I think that’s a really good list to keep things in perspective of what to expect, because those three you shared were really important, of not being able to have everyone like you, and things don’t just magically come out of the sky. I definitely know that that has been a case in my own personal experience and probably a lot of others. I’m curious, within the article, if you had any takeaways of what they offered in the way of solutions.

Leila O’Hara:

It’s more just keeping it in perspective. A lot of times what I do, and what I think a lot of job seekers may do, is you get stuck in these mental traps, and you think, “Oh, this is the way it is”, but you have to keep an open mind and not be limited to one perspective because that can really be your downfall.

Jessica Black:

I like that.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I do too and I’ll confess, I have done all three of these things. I haven’t looked at the whole list of eight, but I bet I’ve done all of them as well. I remember about fifteen years into my career, I had an interview for a position with a foundation and part of the selection panel was a US senator. I thought that I was just not going to have a chance and I talked myself out of going in for the interview because I thought I was going to fail. I remember how surprised the hiring manager was when I called to withdraw, but I recall at the time I thought, “Oh I just can’t afford another setback.” Now in hindsight, I can see that I should have gone. Every interview process is competitive, but if you do your preparation… You never know where lightning is going to strike. That was a door I didn’t open and in hindsight, I regret it. I didn’t open it because this misleading expectation that I shouldn’t have paid attention to.

Leila O’Hara:

Yeah, that’s a great insight.

Mac Prichard:

Well, great. If you’ve got a suggestion for Leila, please write her; her address is leila@macslist.org.

Now Jessica, it’s your turn, you’re up. Reach into that mailbag. We’re going to have to add a sound effect someday.

Jessica Black:

Oh, we should do that, that would be fun!

Mac Prichard:

Alright, what do you hear from our listeners this week?

Jessica Black:

We have a question from Terry Williamson, from Eugene, Oregon. He says:

“Here’s my job search pet peeve: When you’re applying for a job online and they ask you to upload a resume but then they also ask you to re-enter all of the information from your resume into separate “work history” fields. Why do companies do this?”

The short answer of this, Terry, is: an applicant tracking system. It’s a lot easier for companies to be able to understand what it is you’re offering if you enter it twice. There is, I’m sure with those types of systems, they’re not going through the actual resume so they’re asking you to put it in separate fields so they can run the keyword searches. They can scan and make sure that you’re the right fit before they even look at your resume.

It’s annoying, I agree with you, it’s frustrating and annoying but it’s going to pay off in the long run. Because if you take the time to do this well, and by doing this well, I mean matching those key words because that really is what they’re searching for. Make sure you put in the specific words from the job description that they’ve listed into your resume. Make sure you take that extra time to do that, which is also very annoying and frustrating, especially when you’ve already sent out a lot of resumes and done a lot of applications. But it is going to pay off in the long run if you do have those skills that are going to transfer and they bring you in for the interview, and you can talk about why you are that perfect fit.

Again, that’s the applicant tracking system is why they’re doing that and that is the way of the future as we’ve talked about on this podcast. I think you might just have to embrace it.

What else would you guys recommend for Terry?

Leila O’Hara:

Yeah, I think that was some great advice, Jessica. I know it’s hard for job seekers out there because you’re right, it is the way of the future and a lot of really big corporations use this. Maybe if this is something that you’re really not enjoying and you don’t see yourself working for a large corporation, maybe stick to smaller companies.

Jessica Black:

Yeah that’s right. Not every organization is going to use that specific kind.

Leila O’Hara:

Right, but it’s becoming more and more prevalent and I think that despite how time consuming and annoying uploading your resume and then re-entering everything can be, it’s really important not to rush through that process either because if you make one tiny little typo or you just have all these mistakes coming through when you re-enter your information, that can really hamper your chances.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I think your point about keywords here is really crucial, Jessica, because many people may just copy and paste text from their resume into their work history field, but I like your idea which is, pay attention to what matters to the employer. Identify the words that matter. Now is the time to do things right, and as you say, Leila, pay attention to the automatic disqualifiers like typos. If you do it in a strategic and thoughtful way, you’re going to be more competitive than people who are simply copying and pasting their resume into the work history. It is more work to both do the research and do the copying and the writing, but it could lead to a competitive advantage against the other applicants.

Jessica Black:

Yeah, that’s right.

Mac Prichard:

But it is work.

Jessica Black:

It is. We feel for you but it does really make the difference.

Mac Prichard:

It does, and again, so many people, and I don’t think this is the case with our listener, but they just apply everywhere and you do really want to be strategic and thoughtful about where you do apply. A good application will take you an hour or two at a minimum, to do the research and all the work. Be thoughtful about the places you do apply and recognize that it’s going to take some effort to put together an application, but if you do that, and do it well, you’ll be doing things your competitors aren’t doing and it’ll give you an advantage.

Jessica Black:

Yeah, good luck, Terry.

Mac Prichard:

Let us know how it goes, Terry, and thank you for the question. If you’ve got a question for Jessica, please send her an email. Her address is jessica@macslist.org. You can also call our listener line; that’s area-code 716-JOB-TALK, or post your question on the Mac’s List Facebook group.

However you do it, if we use your question on the show, we’ll send you a copy of Land Your Dream Job Anywhere.

We’ll be back in a moment. When we return, I’ll talk with this week’s guest expert, Taranum Khan, about how to make your resume attractive to recruiters.

Is a simple mistake keeping you from getting job interviews? Your resume is probably the first place an employer sees your name. What you say about yourself often determines if a hiring manager interviews you. Making just one mistake on your resume can doom even the most qualified candidate.

That’s why I created my new checklist, Don’t Make These 8 Killer Resume Mistakes. In this free download, I show you top resume blunders I see job seekers make. Avoid these eight killer errors and you’re well on your way to a winning resume.

Visit macslist.org/resumemistakes to get your free guide today.

Now, let’s get back to the show.

Now let’s turn to this week’s guest expert, Taranum Khan.

Taranum Khan is a certified career strategist who helps her clients rediscover the strengths within themselves. She also serves as a regional ambassador for Career Professionals of Canada. Last year, Taranum received a nomination for the association’s award of excellence as an outstanding career professional.

She joins us today from Ontario, in Canada.

Taranum, thanks for being on the show.

Taranum Khan:

Thank you so much for having me, Mac. it’s my pleasure.

Mac Prichard:

Well it’s an honor to have you. Our topic today, as you know, is how to make your resume attractive to recruiters, and just to be clear, we’re focusing on recruiters who are hiring for a particular job, not headhunters. These are hiring managers within a company or maybe people who have been charged with finding candidates for a position. What’s the first step that you recommend, Taranum? When people are looking at their resume, what can they do to make their resume stand out to hiring managers and recruiters?

Taranum Khan:

Well, it’s a great question, Mac. That is where actually everything starts. Highly recommend start with the job posting. It’s very important to set realistic expectations and, generally speaking, I tell my clients, look for the 60/40 ratio. When you pick a job posting, look at the job posting, see what skills, requirements, and qualifications that have been identified by the recruiter. If you have 60% of what has been asked, that is the time you want to start preparing your resume for that job posting. Let the job posting be your guide in terms of, “Is this a job I’m interested in? Do I have the required qualifications? Is this something that I have done before and would I care or enjoy doing it in the future?”

Also look at the logistics. Is it something that is commute worthy? Does it pay enough? All the parameters fall in place for you? If that still makes sense, that is the time that you start working on building a resume around that job posting. That would be my first step.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I like that a lot because I think that some people, they want to work and it may be urgent that they find a job somewhere, so they apply everywhere don’t they? Why isn’t that a good strategy, Taranum?

Taranum Khan:

There’s an actual term that’s used to define people like that, we call them “clickers”; they will apply left, right, and center, whatever job comes. They will use a generic resume that they have not taken the time to tailor, they will start sending that resume out. Honestly, that kind of approach never works because no recruiter is interested in looking at a generic resume.

Not only that, most companies now are going to be utilizing ATS, which is an Applicant Tracking Software, to screen resumes that meet the requirements and the skills that are required to do the job. That approach is very redundant because your resume is not going to get picked. It’s going to screen itself out from the pool of applicants that are applying.

You need to look at the job posting, look at the keywords, find what matches the needs of the recruiter, and what skills you are bringing to the table. Tailor it and then submit it.

Mac Prichard:

I’ve never heard that expression “clickers” before; that’s a new one to me, but it really rings true. I think that’s an apt way of describing people who do that. I want to acknowledge that for some people it’s urgent that they find work, but they really do need to use their time strategically, don’t they?

Taranum Khan:

Oh, they do. Because if you’re not using the time strategically, you are ending up wasting the time that you need to actually save. Doing the research well will help you identify the job that you can actually acquire. You will make the time. On a given day, if you are looking, it takes around an hour and a half for somebody like me who does resumes day in and day out. Given that scenario for a generic person, it takes around three hours to build a resume off of a job posting, and creating a cover letter, and using all the words, the phrases, and tailoring it to the requirements, then submitting.

If you do that well, the chances are, if you were to send out seven to ten applications, you will have at least three interview calls. But if you are sending out generic applications, it’s not going to get you the results you’re looking for.

Mac Prichard:

I also want to touch on a point you made at the beginning which is, when you’re looking at a position, if you meet 60% of the qualifications an employer is requiring, you should consider applying if it meets your other needs. I think that’s an important point that you’re making because so many people think if they don’t have one hundred percent of the job qualifications, or 90%, it’s not worth their effort. Can you talk more about that and why it can be effective if you only have 60 or 70% of the qualifications to go ahead and submit an application?

Taranum Khan:

Sure. There are certain sections in a job posting. First there is the qualifications, then there is the must-haves, then is the good-to-have, and there are certain things that come under the category of transferable skills. When you’re looking at a job posting, first of all, you want to look at the must-haves; those are the most important. If you do not have the must-haves, there is no point in wasting your time.

But when it comes to the good-to-have, that will add an edge to your application. Sometimes, for example, if you are a teacher, and now the position requires instruction or facilitation, it’s a transferable skill you can take from your teaching role into an instructor or facilitator role. Same thing, if you are working in a customer service industry, doing it in person and you wanted to apply for a call center role, it’s still customer service and you do have the skills. Those are transferable, you can take them into a call center setting.

You have to look for the transferable skills and see how you can make a match between what you have and what you can bring to the table and how you can convince the recruiter in terms of, “Okay, you’re asking for these prerequisites. Not only do I have those, but I can bring more to you.”

Also, the way you present your information is very important here, Mac. I would like to emphasize that sometimes people have everything that is needed but the way they present the information is not the way the recruiter wants to see it. If you have not done a neat job on the resume in terms of how you present it, the chances of your resume making it to the human eye are reduced. The layout of the resume is also very important here.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, well let’s step back for a moment. At the beginning, someone has found a position that interests them, they’ve got 60% or more of the qualifications and it meets their other requirements in terms of commuting and the like. Now they’ve taken that posting, they’ve printed it out, and they’re ready to adapt their resume for an application. As you said earlier, if you’re doing it right, for somebody who is not a resume writer, it may take two and a half to three hours.

What do they do? They’ve got their resume, they’ve got the posting, what happens next, Taranum?

Taranum Khan:

Well, the first thing you want to do is just get a highlighter or get a marker. Take your job posting and highlight all the keywords, all the must-haves, all the good-to-haves, and the responsibilities that are expected of you in that job. Then take your resume and see what all matches. Highlight all of the things you have that you are bringing to the table and match them to the qualifications. Once all of the things are highlighted, let’s say you have not put certain things that you were able to highlight in the job posting, you have not put in the resume. Now is the time that you take those keywords and add them to your resume.

Some people do ask me, “Oh, but is it not plagiarizing that I’m just taking those words and putting them into the resume?” You have to be mindful of how you put them in. You have to tell a story through your resume. Either those words have to be a part of sentences that you’re going to write in terms of your responsibilities, or they’re going to be part of the achievements that you write about on your resume, or they’re going to be a part of the profile that you write.

Once you have highlighted from the job posting the keywords, the next step is to incorporate those keywords into the resume to be able to tell a story which will interest the recruiter into having the conversation with you. That would be your next step.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, before we get there, let’s talk about the structure of the resume that you recommend. Taranum, how should people organize their content? Is it a chronological resume? Is it functional? What do you find is most effective with hiring managers?

Taranum Khan:

There are three major types of resumes; one is the chronological as you mentioned, the other is the functional resume, and then there’s the combination resume. For most cases, the combination works the best because that is the most eye catching to a recruiter. The chronological will tell a history of the person in a reverse chronological order. The functional resume focuses only on skills that the person has which matches the job in hand or the skills that are listed in the job posting. A combination resume does a good combination, as the name suggests, of both.

Now also remember that when you’re doing a combination resume, the best structure to follow is, start with your profile. I will take a step back here; start with the header which has your name, has your contact number, and has your email. If you have a social media profile, let’s say on LinkedIn, I would surely incorporate that into the header. This is followed by putting the job title that you found on the job posting as the first thing on your resume. Now again, we have a word we use for this particular approach; it’s called “Aligning the title”, so that shows the recruiter that you have taken the time to research the job posting well. You are taking the job title from there and incorporating it into your resume.

This is followed by your profile and in the profile you are telling your story about how you are the best fit for the job. For example, “Career professional having X amount of experience in handling resumes, facilitation”, whatever. You build a story. Not too long, maybe five to seven lines. Then, the next section is your key strengths. Identify six to nine maximum, and these need to be keywords. For example, “Communication skills”, “Negotiation”, “Rapport building”, “Business development”. These are keywords that you will put.

Now this section is followed by, and this is the most important, achievements. Have at least three achievements. Not too many again, we just want it to be a teaser. Three achievements listed that are very close to the kind of role or function that is expected of you in the job that you’re applying for. When I say this, to give you an example, “Recognized as a team member three months consecutively”, “Met 100% of sales targets consecutively for a year”, awarded, acknowledged, these other keywords that you want to start your statement with.

Mac Prichard:

These are results that people produced or have been recognized for.

Taranum Khan:

Yes, so those would be your achievements. Now for this section, three is more than enough. Followed by your professional experience and here, you are listing in reverse chronological order, your previous experience. Your job title, the name of the company, from when to when. Under each of these, if you have had more than one, under each of the titles, you will give around five, maximum seven, bullet points of the responsibilities that you had.

The last part that you want to put on the resume is your education and professional development.

Mac Prichard:

Now, Taranum, what about personal interests and hobbies? Do you recommend including those?

Taranum Khan:

I recommend that you do not put any of those things. Resumes are evolving by the day and the standards as of now, especially if you’re a highly qualified professional, the idea is to bring forth the important aspects of what you can do for the employer rather than telling them about what your personal interests are. Focus on what is needed in the job and how can you make the life of your employer easier and more comfortable.

Mac Prichard:

Two quick follow up questions for you, Taranum. Let’s talk about presentation and let’s talk about length. How important is it to pay attention to format, and this is an age old question about resumes which I’m sure you get a lot, one page or two?

Taranum Khan:

Both is okay, there’s no right or wrong answer when it comes to one page or two. Both are acceptable, depending on the amount of experience you’re putting forth, depending on the kind of information you need to bring to the table.

Now the only thing you want to remember is, please don’t do one and half or one and one third. Please don’t do that. Either do one full page or do two full pages. Always go for normal to moderate setting if you’re using a Word document. Do not ever do narrow settings, it does not look good. It has to be very easy on the eye for the recruiter to read. Make sure you’re using fonts that most systems would be familiar with or have. For example, Filigree, Arial, or Arial Narrow. These are the fonts you want to go for. Do not use small fonts just because you want to fit in the information. Always keep it at least a size eleven or twelve. That is also very important…the readability is very important.

The white space on a resume is also very important. These are a few things…it should be neat and easy on the eyes of the recruiter to read. It needs to act as an appetizer, a hook for the recruiter to get interested in you, rather than giving them all the information. Again, there is another term we use for that, some people like to take an “Information dump on”, and that is something which recruiters do not appreciate.

Mac Prichard:

It’s not an encyclopedia, is it? You’re putting your best foot forward but less is more here, isn’t it?

Taranum Khan:

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. Well, I really appreciate the very tactical advice you’re giving here about fonts and white space. I also want to acknowledge where we started which is, you’ve got have a strategy, know your keywords, and be prepared to invest time in an application. This isn’t something you just dash off. If you’re doing it well, it’s going to take you two to three hours, isn’t it?

Taranum Khan:

Absolutely. I promise you, that time pays off. People who take the time to put energy and effort into preparing a proper resume and doing a good cover letter, they are working smarter and they will see the results. In fact, not only this, but I would say once you have prepared a resume, it’s time for you to have another pair of eyes look at it and make sure there’s no errors in it. Because it looks very bad if you are sending something that has spelling errors or grammatical mistakes; that does not give a very good impression of you. Please take the time to have another person look at it and review it before you submit it.

Mac Prichard:

Excellent advice, Taranum. Now tell us, what’s coming up next for you?

Taranum Khan:

I am so excited about contributing to an ebook that is coming out this November and Career Professionals of Canada is going to be publishing that e-book. I’m really, really excited. I just finished the draft and submitted it.

Mac Prichard:

That’s great. Terrific, well I know people can learn more about you and your work by visiting your LinkedIn page. They can also find you on Twitter; your handle is @taranumkhan. Taranum, thanks for being on the program today.

Taranum Khan:

Thank you so much for having me, Mac, it’s been a pleasure and I’d be more than happy if someone wants to reach out to me with questions. It’s my pleasure answering them. Thank you so much again for having me here.

Mac Prichard:

You’re welcome. Take care, Taranum.

We’re back in the studio with Jessica and Leila. What were some key points for you two? Leila, you want to kick off?

Leila O’Hara:

Yeah, for sure. I thought that she did a great job of explaining how to look at each job listing as a set of questions. Think of it as, are these requirements something I can do? Do these responsibilities match what I want to be doing? Going through it almost as a checklist of, “Is this a right fit for me?” Before you even take the time to craft your resume and make sure that it’s appropriate for the job. Taking a step back and thinking about, “Is this a right fit for me?” first.

Then, I really liked the point she made about just taking your time with every single job application because it does take a long time. I think when you’re out there job hunting, you think, “I can get twenty job applications done in a day, no problem”, but realistically that’s not the best way to do things because you really want to craft everything to be very specific for that one job listing. That way, your characteristics really shine through.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, the expression “clicker” I know I mentioned that in the conversation, that it was a first for me, but it rings true.

Leila O’Hara:

It does, yeah.

Mac Prichard:

I know people do that because they’re looking for work but you’ve got to use your time wisely, as she said.

Leila O’Hara:

You do.

Jessica Black:

Like we said before and like you said just now, Leila, it helps you stand out. People can really tell when you are just sending out those resumes, twenty a day, and you’re not taking the time to tailor. I really liked her practical advice on how to go about that and her emphasis on really studying the job description and your own resume and making sure they match up.

I really liked her emphasis on…There was one thing she said about the plagiarism, of people saying, “Isn’t this plagiarism?” I think that was something really interesting of it easily can be if you just copy and paste.

Mac Prichard:

Her point about keywords.

Jessica Black:

Right, and it easily can be if you just copy and paste directly from the job description. If you really take the time to pull out the keywords and turn them into your own words, that’s how you should do it.

Mac Prichard:

Agreed, and I also just want to go back to her point about the numbers game. Sometimes people think… She made the point, well, you might only apply for seven jobs if you are spending two or three hours on each application but you’re going to get a much better response rate. You’ll probably get interviews for the majority of those positions. So many people who, again, play that clicker game, they think, “Well, if I apply for a hundred, I’ll get ten callbacks and five interviews”, but you’re not using your time smartly as she said.

Jessica Black:

Yeah.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. Well, thank you both, and thank you, Taranum, for joining us this week, and thank you, our listeners, for downloading today’s episode of Find Your Dream Job.

Make sure you present yourself in the best possible way when you apply for a position. Create an error-free resume that can get you interviews and job offers. Get my new guide, Don’t Make These 8 Killer Resume Mistakes.

Go to macslist.org/resumemistakes.

Join us next Wednesday when our special guest will be Kerri Twigg. She’ll share her best tips about how to answer the question, “Tell me about yourself”.

Until next time, thanks for letting us help you find your dream job!

With today’s competitive job market, submitting your resume online to recruiters can sometimes feel like throwing it into a black hole. However, there’s a better way to highlight your skills, select strategic keywords, and build a better resume that will attract recruiters who are hiring. Tarunum Khan, certified career strategist, shares how to get started on this episode of Find Your Dream Job.

About Our Guest: Taranum Khan

Taranum Khan, Ph. D is a certified career strategist and ambassador for Career Professionals of Canada. In 2017 she received the nomination for Award of Excellence as an “Outstanding Career Professional.”

Her passion is creating a positive impact on career and academic journey of the lives she touches, locally and globally. Every conversation with her is uplifting and inspiring as she inverts the focus for you to rediscover the strengths within you!

Resources in this Episode:

  • New tool: False expectations can be holding you back from finding your next career. The Ladders shares 8 unrealistic expectations that smart people ignore.
  • Listener question: Terry Williamson from Eugene, Oregon asks “Here’s my job search pet peeve: When you’re applying for a job online and they ask you to upload a resume. But then they also ask you to re-enter all of the information from your resume into separate ‘work history’ fields. Why do companies do this?”
  • More from our guest: Connect with Taranum on LinkedIn and Twitter.