What to Do After a Job Interview, with Deena Pierott

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Transcript

Mac Prichard:

This is Find Your Dream Job. The podcast that helps you get hired at the career you want and make a difference in life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac’s List. I’m joined by my co-host Ben Forstag, managing director of Mac’s List and Jenna Forstrom, our community manager.

This week we’re talking about what you need to do after a job interview. Our show is brought to you by our book Land Your Dream Job In Portland And Beyond. To learn more about the updated edition that we published earlier this year, visit macslist.org/book.

Jenna Forstrom:

Hey Mac, Jenna here.

Mac Prichard:

Hey Jenna. You’ve displaced Ben. You’ve taken control of the transmitter.

Jenna Forstrom:

Moving on up.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, I’m watching my back.

Jenna Forstrom:

We’ve been doing a lot of public speaking this spring. I’m curious. What are the most common challenges you hear from job seekers?

Mac Prichard:

Well, all three of us have been at different events this spring and one of my experiences Jenna has been the question that comes up again and again is goals. People, when I ask them what kind of job they’re looking for, often I hear, “Well, I want to keep all my options open. I don’t want to rule anything out.”

The difficulty with that is you make it hard for people to say yes to you and that’s one of the issues we deal with in our book Land Your Dream Job In Portland And Beyond. We have a chapter that actually showed you how to assess your interests and your skills and figure out what your goals are. You can find both in the book and on our blog and other resources in our website.

Jenna Forstrom:

Awesome. Thanks for sharing.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, no problem.

Ben Forstag:

Mac, when you mentioned that goal setting thing, I heard a great analogy once someone was saying. Imagine you want to go to the prom and you walk into the cafeteria in your high school and you just say like, “I’m going to go to prom with anyone. It doesn’t matter who it is. No matter what you look like, no matter how bad you smell, I’ve got no criteria for this.”

The likelihood that you’re going to get any date is probably pretty low because everyone wants to feel like they’re the special one for you and I think employers are the same way. If you go in saying like, “I don’t care what the job is. I’ll do anything.” That trends people off because they want the enthusiastic candidate, not the jack of all trades.

Mac Prichard:

I think focus is the key whether it’s the high school prom or your job search. Let’s start to this week’s topic. We’ve talked in earlier shows about what you could do to prepare for and nail a job interview but what happens next after you’ve impressed your interviewers? You walk out of the room and you’re feeling good about your conversation. It’s a big moment but the steps you take next after you leave the interview room can make the difference between getting a job offer or a tourist rejection letter.

This week we’re talking with our guest expert Deena Pierott, she’s the founder and CEO of Mosaic Blueprint. She’ll tell us what you can do to increase the odds of getting a job offer after you leave the interview room.

The receptionist maybe the last person you see when you leave in the office where you’ve interviewed. Ben Forstag has a story that outlines what a receptionist can tell you about an organization’s culture and the role they may play in your hiring and before an employer makes an offer, she’ll likely check your references.

Our listeners wonders when do you tell your boss to expect a call. Jenna Forstrom has the answer. Let’s first turn to the Mac’s List team. I’m curious. Jenna, Ben, what are your top recommendations for job seekers after they finish an interview?

Ben Forstag:

This is going to be the obvious one I think but one is to write a thank you note both an email one and a paper note later on because I like the instant thank you of the email and then the longer thought at one. I think the key with both those is trying to connect the note to the conversation you’ve previously had in person.

“Oh, we talked about X, Y and Z and I really thought that was interesting.” Just so this doesn’t look like a pro forma interaction. It’s something that you thought about and have processed accordingly.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it’s remarkable to me how many people don’t still send a thank you note. It’s not a large number but there aren’t people who forget to do that.

Ben Forstag:

Let me ask you Mac. You get these. What do you do with these thank you notes?

Mac Prichard:

If they’re handwritten, I actually hold on to them. I have a folder that I keep of thank you notes from people not only who … not that many people I’ve interviewed for jobs here but I do do a lot of information interviews and the notes that I get that are written by hand I do hold on to.

Ben Forstag:

This is more than just like a social courtesy. These are meaningful things that you find important.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, in visiting other people’s offices I often seen that people will post thank you notes in their cubicles or on their walls or share them with co-workers. What about you Jenna? What’s your top tip for post interviews?

Jenna Forstrom:

I think sending a follow up email is key saying thank you, following up with any information that you promised in the interview like, “Oh, I’ve got a portfolio. Let me email you a link.” or “We talked about some random NPR article that the interview or hadn’t heard of.”

You just send it just like, “Hey, remember this conversation we had?” But I also enjoy getting the handwritten or writing the handwritten notes. I think of it more as a marketing because chances are the hiring manager is hiring or meeting with a whole bunch of people and if they’re in HR, that’s almost what they do all they from multiple roles, a week later you might have been completely forgot and then this card arrives in the mail and everyone loves getting handwritten letters.

It’s not a build, it’s not a political note from the upcoming elections or anything like that but it’s tailored specifically towards them and it keeps you fresh in front of mine and these people, these hiring manager’s lives which I think is really cool.

Mac Prichard:

Making those personal connection it can make all the difference I think. Thank you both. Ben, let’s turn to you. I know you’re out there every week poking around the internet looking for resources, what have you found for us this Wednesday?

Ben Forstag:

This week I’m going to share an article from the Wall Street Journal titled The Receptionist Is Watching You and this is a piece from 2012 but I think the content is still relevant and appropriate for today’s job seekers. We all know that employers plays heavy emphasis on finding candidates who seem to fit with their established company culture.

In fact, according to one study by the corporate executive board, 88% of recruiters said that they view a candidates fit with the company culture as critically important compared to just 82% who said the same about technical requirements. It’s really how you’re going to fit culturally is more important than the skills you actually bringing to the table.

The question here is how do employers figure out that you’re a good culture fit? Partly, that’s clearly through the formal interview process but it’s also through your informal behavior before and after the interview and increasingly employers use your interactions with the receptionist, the security guard and other workers to evaluate whether you’re the right candidate.

This article is all about how companies use the receptionists to judge candidates. It discusses several organizations where the receptionist has direct input in the hiring process providing insight on the first impressions of the candidate and one CEO noted that these first impressions generally formed while the applicant is waiting in the lobby become relevant to the hiring decisions between five and ten percent of the time which is incredible that you can get a foot up or you can fail the interview before you even step into the interview room.

The lesson here is be nice to everyone during, before and after an interview. This is generally a best practice but especially when you’re looking to get a new job.

Mac Prichard:

Were there any horror stories shared in the article about how people misbehaved towards receptionists or security guards?

Ben Forstag:

There was some choice quotes from the some receptionists and some of the things they were saying were like head scratchers. Of course that was a bad decision, the guy who shows up in wrinkled clothes and pulls out a resume that’s all torn up and got smudges of chocolate on it. That person is not getting anywhere whether they made a good impression with the secretary or not but other things like the candidate came in and was very hoity and demanding of the receptionist.

That’s the kind of thing that someone who’s getting themselves pumped up for an interview might not think about but that’s creating a first impression with this frontline of the interview process that’s not going to serve you well in the long-term.

Mac Prichard:

In some organizations too, people may begin at entry level positions over receptionist to administrative assistant or even intern but three, five, seven years later they could be a senior manager and depending on the organization that’s cultured. You never know where people are going to end up.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah.

Jenna Forstrom:

They’re going to … If you get the role, they’re going to be your co-worker. You want to always have beyond a good foot with them. You don’t want to start off day zero or a day negative one on a bad foot with a co-worker. I just think everyone should be nice to everyone like how you said it but really think about it.

Ben Forstag:

This is just one of the many tricks I guess you would say that employers use to figure out that whole culture fit thing and we’ve talked about other tools that employers used. I know here at Mac’s List for example. The first two or three interviews I had here were just with you Mac and then one of the later stage interviews I got to meet the rest of the staff and we went out and had coffee and spent an hour just chatting.

That was how we figure out culture fit but keeping in mind that the interview process might start before the formal interview starts. I think that’s the key thing here. The moment you step out of your car or out of the metro or however you’re getting to that interview having your game face on and being professional but at the end of the day, it’s about being yourself and being polite to people the way you want other to treat you.

Mac Prichard:

Well, thank you Ben. Do you have a suggestion for Ben? You can email him directly. His address is ben@macslist.org. Now, let’s turn you our listeners. It’s time to talk to with Jenna Forstrom, our community manager and she joins us to answer one of your questions. Jenna, what are you hearing from the community this week?

Jenna Forstrom:

This week’s question is a perspective employer has asked for my references from my last three jobs. The problem is I haven’t told my current boss that I’m looking for other work. Should I tell my employer now even though the new job isn’t a 100% in the bag or ask the perspective employer not to contact my current place of work?

Mac Prichard:

Good question.

Jenna Forstrom:

This is a really good question. I think it goes one of two ways. If you have a great relationship with your boss, one that’s more of a mentor and mentoringship or a engagement where he or she is fighting for you no matter if you stay in the company or if you’re moving out of the company but they want what’s best for you.

You should totally talk to them about it because maybe there are some room to grow or they can give you an excellent letter of recommendation which would then theoretically you could probably negotiate for more money based on reviews. It’s one option and then the second option is is if you don’t have a great relationship with your boss, chances are they’re not going to give you a good review so just asking the potential future employer not to contact your current boss but maybe provide three previous roles or a co-worker that you trust or someone who can keep it more on the down low would be a really good opportunity. Mac, Ben, what do you guys think?

Mac Prichard:

I think one option and this is true of any reference really is you can just say, “Here’s a list of references and I just asked that you don’t reach out to these people unless I’m really one of the finalists.” I think most employers are respectful of that and frankly, they don’t want to be reaching out to references if you’re not going to be a finalist anyway.

You could say, “My current employer, if that could be the very last person you reached out to.” Just to give me some time to prepare them or let them know if this is a real possibility.

Ben Forstag:

I think that’s right.

Mac Prichard:

I also agree with you Jenna that it’s important when you have that good relationship with the boss and let them know that you may be looking because when you’re able to do that, often it means that you’ve … it’s clear that there aren’t other opportunities to grow in the firm and good supervisors will want to see their staff grow and continue to thrive and will recognize that if there aren’t opportunities to do that inside the current company that it’s best for everybody involved to move on.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, and also I mean if you like the place you’re working at right now and the reason you’re looking is for some other reason maybe you want more money or you want some different responsibility, opening the conversation with your existing boss that you are looking also creates an opportunity to talk about things that your current … ways that your current job could be improved to be what you wanted.

Whether that means more money or different responsibilities, it gives your current employer an opportunity to essentially match the offer that you might be getting from this future job.

Mac Prichard:

Terrific. Thank you Jenna and if you have a question for Jenna, please email her. Jenna’s email address is jenna@macslist.org. These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job In Portland And Beyond. We’ve made our book even better. We added new content and we’re offering it in the format you want.

For the first time ever you could read Land Your Dream Job In Portland And Beyond as a paper back or downloaded it onto your Kindle, Nook or iPad. Whatever the format, our goal is the same. It’s to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work that makes a difference. For more information, visit macslist.org/book.

Now, let’s turn to this week’s guest expert Deena Pierott. Deena Pierott is the CEO of Mosaic Blueprint. It’s a boutique firm that specializes in recruiting and onboarding multicultural communications, outplacement services and career counseling. She’s also the founder of iUrban Teen and she’s been named the Champion of Change by the White House and included in Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 List. Deena, thank you for joining us.

Deena Pierott:

Well, thank you for having me today Mac. Appreciate it.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it’s a pleasure to have you on the show. We’re talking about what to do after a job interview and just to paint the picture for our listeners, let’s imagine we’ve gone in there, we’ve had a terrific conversation, we’re walking out, we’re feeling good about what happened, what do we do next Deena? What can make the difference between getting a job offer and getting that rejection letter?

Deena Pierott:

There’s so many pieces to the puzzle. The hardest part is getting that actual job interview but now since you’ve known that you’ve aced your opportunity, you made it in that interview, you think you did really well, what happens next is very, very important. I can’t stress that enough to candidates.

Some of those things include things that the old school thing to do, writing a thank you card. Don’t send en electronic email. Do it the old fashion way. Have them already to go after your interview. Make sure you get everyone’s business cards if you have a panel, three, four, five six people. Make sure you can try to get everybody’s email addresses or business cards so you can send that thank you card off that same day.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, get that card out within 24hours is that your suggestion?

Deena Pierott:

Oh yeah, within 24-hours. I was so impressed with the young man that we worked with here recently. We just did a search project for a local nonprofit and he … They received, I was just the middle person but the interviewers actually received their thank you cards from him the very next day, the very next day.

Short and sweet, to the point, not some long love letter, very short and simple but that makes such an impression on everyone and he is well. He had one for me as well but everyone received it within 24 hours of that interview. Those are key things to remember to do. Go back to the old school way of doing things I know everybody is all just digital and everything but for something like this, you want to make it personal. You want a handwritten note.

Mac Prichard:

Deena, why do think that makes a difference? Why isn’t an email message alone sufficient? Why does a handwritten note stand out?

Deena Pierott:

I think that everyone is starting to get tired of all the impersonal pieces of being online and being constantly wired all the time. When you see someone that has taken the time to get a card hand write it out, put a stamp on it and send it to you. That just shows more effort on their part, more organization on their part and just a little bit more personal touch for me as a recruiter. When I was in the working role and we were doing hiring, that would always stand out to me.

Mac Prichard:

A handwritten note can be a huge advantage now.

Deena Pierott:

It can be a huge advantage.

Mac Prichard:

Okay.

Deena Pierott:

But also not to say that an electronic email won’t work either but the personal touch to it, that high touch point is always best.

Mac Prichard:

Talk about that personal touch. If you do send an email and you said earlier about a handwritten note, don’t write a love letter, are there key messages or points people should make when they send that note, whether it’s electronically or written by hand?

Deena Pierott:

No, it should be written by hand.

Mac Prichard:

Okay.

Deena Pierott:

Don’t type it out yet. Handwrite it out. Even if your handwriting is horrible like mine, I write like a doctor but it still something about that handwritten note is just key.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. It’s a handwritten note. Let’s talk about how people should connect online. Do you recommend that candidates follow up, connect with people say via LinkedIn after an interview or perhaps before?

Deena Pierott:

I wouldn’t encourage that. I wouldn’t encourage that because it almost seems like stalking. It almost seems like you’re brown-nosing. You’re trying to kiss up. I would wait. I would wait until after the job offer has been made. Even if it’s not you, wait until that closes out then you can go ahead and connect on LinkedIn.

I think Facebook is always too personal for those kind of things but LinkedIn and Tweeter and even with LinkedIn when you’re connecting with them, say something like, “It was a great experience interviewing with you even though I did not receive the position, I would still like to stay in touch.”

Some thing like that but don’t do it during that process. Wait and even wait maybe a week or so after the decision has been made.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, let’s talk more about the interview process after someone’s left the interview room. Let’s say a candidate knows somebody inside the company, what do you recommend Deena? Is it appropriate to have a friend or a formal colleague who works inside the organization or perhaps just a former co-worker of someone on the panel to call or send an email on your behalf?

Deena Pierott:

Oh, gosh yeah. That’s all about networking and I will tell anyone that if you know somebody within that organization, let them put a good word in for you because companies will listen to their employees unless they’re a bad employee but customers will … but companies will listen to those employees and you might have a slight advantage by having that person vouch for you by all means ask them if they would say and encourage them or say a few good words about you in your experience.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, now let’s say you’ve done that, you’ve sent your note and you have a former co-worker or friend who’s made a call on your behalf and you think, “Boy, this is my dream job.” Do you recommend that people if they’re pursuing other job opportunities keep chasing those opportunities as well or should they focus just on the dream position?

Deena Pierott:

No, I would say in this highly competitive paced that we’re in. I would say keep your options open. Never put all your eggs in one basket. Consistently have a few sources that you’re reviewing and considering. That one dream job, it’s only one job. There were other dream jobs out there for you.

I would say always keep your options open and even getting into a space where this just actually happened. The candidate that was hired for the role, I knew that he was also being vetted by another company and as soon as the hiring company heard that, they expedited the hiring process so that they can secure him.

You might be able to use that as leverage if that company really wants you, if they have an idea that someone else wants you as well, that may work so I never, even when I was out looking for jobs, I never just focused on just one.

Mac Prichard:

Deena, if it’s been a week and you haven’t heard anything from an employer where you interviewed, how do you recommend people follow up? What should they do next?

Deena Pierott:

I would say send an email to the recruiter whoever was that first point of contact for you. Don’t contact. I wouldn’t contact the hiring manager right off the bat. I would check in with the recruiter to see if they have an update because usually they are the ones that are going to let you know what the next steps are.

If that recruiter is not available, if you have the hiring manager’s information which you should because you sent them a thank you card then I would follow up with them and just say, “I’m just wondering. I had a great experience. Just wondering where are you in the hiring process yet? I didn’t want to drop off your radar or something and I don’t know if I’d wait a week for that. Maybe about three or four days just probably make sure that I’m on the radar.” and if I haven’t heard anything, sometimes if you don’t hear anything at all, that’s usually a sign.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it is.

Deena Pierott:

That’s usually a sign that you’re not the one but I would send a note, an email or either a phone call to the recruiter.

Mac Prichard:

People I know want to be persistent but they also don’t want to be passed.

Deena Pierott:

Exactly.

Mac Prichard:

Just a rule of thumb you recommend about the number of attempts one or two or when do you let it go?

Deena Pierott:

I would say two. I would say two and I’ve learned from you. You used to tell me with business, when searching for business the rule of three. I would say two and I say that because I know when people are trying to reach me regarding a job, they can become troublesome if every time I turn around, they’re calling me to find out about the job. I would say give it two tries and if you haven’t heard anything, that’s pretty much a clear indication that they’re looking elsewhere.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I know it can be hard to let go but I think that’s a good advise after two attempts.

Deena Pierott:

Yeah, I would say after two.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. Now, let’s go to the dark place Deena. Let’s say you do get a call and you didn’t get an offer, how do you recommend people stay in touch with that interview panel or that employer? What should they do next?

Deena Pierott:

This is always so hard because I usually am the one that has to this in the Dear John and Dear Jane letters but what I appreciate, what I see happening is if that candidate sends me back a note, an email or even a handwritten note thanking us for the process. They were really impressed with how everything went. They wished the new incumbent well and they hope that we stay in contact. That’s what I really appreciate when I see that from a candidate.

Mac Prichard:

What about when you get a call or a note from a candidate who says, “Can you give me any feedback your decision or something I should have done differently?”

Deena Pierott:

Oh yeah, sometimes I give them three feedback without them even asking but when they do ask, I do … I try to be as honest as possible without being hurtful with them. For instance if they might seem too shy, I would tell them that that gives the sign of weakness a lot of times in an interview and they like people that have that get it done personality a little bit more assertive.

I’ll tell them to speak up and we may even do some little role playing back and forth or I give an example of how they would have answered something in a different, slightly different way. Those kind of things. I’m free to give back feedback as long as it’s not too hurtful because they’re already in pain because they didn’t get the job. The last thing I want to do is put a nail in their coffin.

Mac Prichard:

It’s appropriate to ask for a feedback.

Deena Pierott:

It’s appropriate, very appropriate. In fact, they should because that’s a learning experience for them. Good.

Mac Prichard:

Good. We need to start wrapping up the interview Deena. Anything else you’d like to add about what candidates should do after they’ve finished an interview?

Deena Pierott:

I think that they should one, make sure when they do exit when the interview is over, make sure they thank everyone. If it’s a small group of people like one time we have 15 interviewers, it was crazy but if it’s a small panel, make sure they shake everyone’s hand. Be pleasant. Thank them so much for their time and then make sure you get home and you send those thank you letters, cards out to them immediately. Those are things that you really, really should do.

Mac Prichard:

Great, well thanks Deena. Now, tell us what’s coming up next for you?

Deena Pierott:

Gosh, well what’s happening for me here lately is my Teen program, iUrban Teen. We’ve got a lot of programs going on here in Portland and Seattle. We’ve got some big summits coming up and I’m actually going to be flying down to Los Angeles where I am a speaker at the Wonder Women Tech Conference in Long Beach July … I think it’s July 15th, 16th and 17th so I’m really looking forward to that as well. That’s what I see on the short horizon for right now.

Mac Prichard:

Great. We’ll be sure to include notes to that event and the iUrban’s Teen website in our show notes and I know that people can find you online at mosaicblueprint.com.

Deena Pierott:

That’s correct Mac. You got it.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, well Deena thanks for joining us again. It’s been a pleasure having you on the show.

Deena Pierott:

It has been a delight being here today Mac and thank you so very much and try to stay cool.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, we will. We’re back in the studio with Ben and Jenna. What do you two think? What are some of the key takeaways for you from my conversation with Deena?

Jenna Forstrom:

I really liked your comment about asking for feedback. I think a lot of job seekers don’t do that and it’s really, really insightful when you do get people that provide feedback. When I was job hunting a couple years ago, I interviewed at a make-up company which I am like the world’s biggest tomboy, it was really outside of my field but the woman business owner, I left the interview thinking like, “I want to work for this lady. She is so awesome and so friendly and outgoing and I could do the role because I didn’t actually applied a make-up.”

It was marketing and I was so excited and I thought the interview went really, really well and I found out I didn’t get the role and I was totally crushed and I just wrote an email and I was like, “Well, thanks. I really appreciate it. I had a great to talk with you. Could you provide any feedback?” And she wrote me this really thoughtful email and I was like, “This is what we love about you. This is what … was questionable and she has said and we ended up going with a make up veteran who had been working in the make up world for over 20 years and as as someone who had been on a college for like three years.”

I was like, “Obviously, I would have hired them too.” Immediately lifting my spirits because it was like we were competing on totally different levels of expertise and it wasn’t really a competition but then she also provided a ton of feedback and even though I didn’t get the job I still felt good about the experience. I think when you’re job hunting, you’re usually just getting crushed left and right so just getting great feedback is really helpful.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, there’s a lot of rejection that comes with job searching and I think what I hear from job seekers is they had this what if question when an offer in forthcoming they think, “What if I’ve done this? What if I’ve done that?” One of the great things about employers who give feedback is they help the job seeker understand what they might have done differently but also often that their competition is just has more what the employer was looking for and there’s not much you can do about that. Ben, how about you?

Ben Forstag:

I like some of her tips about following up with the company after the interview. Not the thank you notes but the following up on next steps and status updates and so forth. The one thing I would add to that conversation though is in the interview at the end, when they ask you, “Do you have any other questions?” Asking the interviewer, “What is the process after the this? What is your general timeline?” That gives you some reference point about when it would be appropriate to reach back out to that hiring manager or the recruiter.

If they say, ‘”Were doing interviews for the next two weeks with other candidates.” Then you know that it’s going to be a couple weeks before maybe you get invited back for a second interview in, it gives you a framework for thinking about when you’re going to send out that follow up email to see what the status update is.

Mac Prichard:

You can also ask in that conversation, “How do you recommend I follow up?” and just they will tell you directly and give you … it’s appropriate to ask for the name and email or phone number of the person that you should follow up with as well.

Ben Forstag:

Exactly, they’ll tell you what the best way to do so you’re not stepping on anyone’s toes.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, there’s no mystery about it. Good. Thank you both and if you like what you’re hearing, you our listeners, you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This helps others discover our show and helps us serve you all better. One of the reviews we received recently is from a listener who uses the iTunes handle Becka1965 and she writes, find your dream job is a well done and interesting show. It features real advise from real people. Ben, are we real people?

Ben Forstag:

I can confirm that at least two of us in this room are real people.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, one of us might be a hollogram.

Jenna Forstrom:

Or a robot.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, both interesting ideas for a podcast and audio show. Maybe one of us is a ventriloquist and is doing all the voices. Okay, let’s move on. Thank you Becka1965 and thanks to this, of course of other listeners who’ve left a review. We have a 106 ratings and we’re grateful for the people who’ve taken the moment to do that.

You can leave your own comments and ratings. Just go to macslist.org/iTunes. Thanks for listening. We’ll be back next Wednesday with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job.

We talked in an earlier show about what you can do to prepare for a job interview. But what happens next after you’ve met with your interviewers? Following up after an interview can make the difference between getting a job offer or a terse rejection letter.

This week we’re talking about what to do after a job interview.  Like immediately after you leave the interview room.

This week’s guest, Deena Pierott, provides recruitment and on-boarding services for employers, and she knows what companies are looking for in candidates. Deena discusses what you can do after your in-person interview to improve your chances of landing the job.

This Week’s Guest

Deena Pierott is the CEO of Mosaic Blueprint, a boutique firm that specializes in recruiting and on-boarding, multicultural communications, outplacement services and career counseling. She is also the founder of iUrban Teen and has been named a champion of change by the White House and included in Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 list.

Resources from this Episode