How to Ace a Job Interview, with Janet Brumbaugh

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Transcript

Mac Prichard:                     

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac’s List. Our show is brought to you by Mac’s List and by our book, “Name Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).” To learn more about the book and the new edition that we’re publishing in February, visit macslist.org/ebook.

“Wing It” and “job interview” are two phrases that should never go together in the same sentence. Before you talk to a prospective employer, you need to do your homework and you need to prepare and practice what you will say. This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about how to get ready for your next job interview. While you can’t anticipate every possible question, you can plan for the most common ones.

What about weird interview questions? Ben Forstag has a list of oddball topics employers might bring up. A good job interview is a conversation, not an interrogation of the applicant. You should ask questions of your own. Cecilia Bianco shares with a listener how to do this and she suggests subjects you should address. Our expert guest this week is Janet Brumbaugh. Janet is an executive recruiter who coaches job applicants by putting them through mock interviews that she records and reviews.

As we do every week, let’s start with the Mac’s List team. Ben and Cecilia, you both had your share of job interviews over the years. Why don’t we talk about the highs and lows. What’s the best and the worst job interview experience you’ve ever had?

Cecilia Bianco:                    

My worst experience was a few years back. I was going to my first interview for an internship and I got totally lost on my way there, so I called and let them know. When I called, they said, “Oh, you have an interview today?” They had just no idea. The people who were interviewing me had forgot and weren’t there, so they had to call them. By the time I got there, I still ended up waiting about thirty minutes to meet them. By the time we were both in the room and ready to have the interview, we were just too stressed out, so it didn’t really go well.

Mac Prichard:                     

That was the low. How about the high? What were some of your best interviews?

Cecilia Bianco:

Probably my best interview was when I came to interview here. It just was a really easy conversation. It flowed and both people’s goals were aligned and it just went well. Obviously turned into a career for me.

Mac Prichard:                     

Good. Thanks. Ben, how about you?

Ben Forstag:                         

The worst interview I ever had was scheduled before I took a two-week vacation. I scheduled it the Friday before I left the office, and the interview itself happened the day after I got back from a very long plane flight. It was a 15, 20-hour plane flight from Kenya and I was so jetlagged at the interview and so tired that I don’t even really remember much of the interview happening. The only thing I remember concretely was just going on and on, rambling with my responses. I knew halfway through the interview that this wasn’t going to work and that I was not going to get the offer. That was the worst.

The best interview I had was here in Portland. I was living in D.C. at the time and the employer actually flew me out to their office for the day to do the interview in person. That really gave me a lot of confidence going in that they really wanted me to work there and that the job was really mine to lose in the interview. The other nice thing about that interview was because it was a day-long process, there was a lot of time to have a conversation back and forth, both with the leadership and with the other folks on staff. It was a good way to measure whether I’d be a good fit for their organization both culturally and with the skills I was offering.

Mac Prichard:                     

Good. I think one of my worst experiences was an interview for a communications position with a trade association. I went through two rounds of conversations with people at the organization. I reached the final stage of the process and I was told I was the finalist and it was time to meet the president of the organization. While it wasn’t a formality, I was given the impression going in that the job would be mine if I didn’t screw this up.

I sat down with the president and the first thing she said to me was, “Well, I haven’t been paying attention to this process. I’m not sure we need this position, but if we do, how do you feel about the salary? Would it be okay if we reduced it?” I was just completely taken aback and it was a very awkward conversation. Not surprisingly, I never heard from the organization again. Not quite sure what happened there.

One of the best interviews I’ve had was … In hindsight, at the time it seemed like it was a disaster. I was up for a position here in Portland and the funder of the job was back East and they asked me to do a phone interview, and they wanted me to do it while I was on vacation. I said, “Well, sure, I can do that, but I just want you to know I got this date set aside to spend with family and I can call in.” This was fifteen years ago when cell phones were still a novelty.

I was in Chicago visiting my cousin and she and I and her kids went to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. She had a cell phone, and it was a novelty phone. It looked like a hamburger. It was a flip phone. She said it worked, and it did kind of work, but inside the museum it was very loud and I had to call in and I thought, “Well, this isn’t going to work inside this noisy place.” I went outside and, of course, there was a helicopter hovering above the museum. The phone kept going in and out, and I hung up and I was convinced it had been a disaster.

Ben Forstag:                         

This is your best interview experience?

Mac Prichard:                     

This is my best interview.

Ben Forstag:

Okay.

Mac Prichard:

Here’s why it makes a good interview experience, because I was focused, I was responsive. I didn’t lose my cool, even though things seemed to be going wrong. I got the job and several months later, I met the people on a trip back East who were in that call, and one of them said, “I was just so impressed by how you sounded.” That was the last thing I thought I was doing internally, but I think the point of the story is this, that even when you think things might be going wrong, just keep focused on what you want to accomplish and I think you’ll be pleased with the results.

Let’s move on to Ben, who every week is out there looking for resources that you all can use in your job search or to manage your career. Ben, what have you uncovered for us this week?

Ben Forstag:                         

This week I want to start with a question for Mac and Cecilia. It’s a real simple question. Do you guys know how many cows are in Canada?

Cecilia Bianco:                    

No. I have no idea.

Mac Prichard:

Having grown up in an agricultural state, I could probably answer how many cows in Iowa, but the Canadian angle is stumping me.

Ben Forstag:                         

This obviously is a not-simple question. These are the kinds of questions some organizations are asking applicants nowadays, the kind of thing people need to keep an eye out for when they show up for an interview. My resource this week is actually the Ten Weirdest Job Interview Questions of 2015. This is from the CNNMoney blog, but the questions themselves were submitted and supplied by interviewees on glassdoor.com, yet another week in which Glassdoor gets a shout-out on our show. I thought it would be interesting just to read through the top ten weirdest questions as evaluated on CNNMoney and Glassdoor. We’ll see if you guys know the answers to any of these.

They are, who would win a fight between Spider-Man and Batman? What’s your favorite ’90s jam? Cecilia?

Cecilia Bianco:                    

Oh, gosh, anything by Mariah Carey.

Ben Forstag:

If you woke up and had two thousand unread e-mails and you could only answer three hundred of them, how would you choose which ones to answer? Describe the color yellow to someone who’s blind. If you had a machine that produced $100.00 for life, what would you be willing to pay for it today? What did you have for breakfast? What would you do if you were the only survivor in a plane crash? If you were asked to unload a 747 full of jelly beans, what would you do? How many people flew out of Chicago last year? What’s your favorite Disney princess?

Mac and Cecilia, have you ever encountered a question like this in a job interview?

Cecilia Bianco:                    

No, never.

Mac Prichard:                     

I have not.

Ben Forstag:

Maybe we’re interviewing with nice organizations, Ben, who don’t want to confuse us. I’ve never actually heard one of these either in my career. I think a lot of these are coming from the tech sector where they’re trying to get inside your brain in some unusual way. The key thing to remember with these questions is that even though they’re fairly unusual, there is an underlying logic to them, and it would be really a mistake for you as the job applicant to think that the interviewer was just willfully wasting their time asking silly questions.

Employers are really trying to find out how you think. The reason they’re asking your these curveball questions is to really see how you problem-solve on the fly. The reason I really like this particular blog is that the writer talks with a recruiter and an HR person who discuss the logic behind some of the questions we just talked about. For example, the question about the machine that produces $100.00 for life, the company that asked that question is actually a wealth management firm. What they’re really trying to get at is how do you ascertain and define investments and how can you talk about investments so that you could sell them to our customers. In that light, it makes a whole lot more sense.

Cecilia Bianco:                    

Yeah, that one makes sense. I’m still not clear on why they would ever ask about who your favorite Disney princess was.

Ben Forstag:                         

That one’s an easy one.

Cecilia Bianco:

Okay.

Ben Forstag:

Come on. Of course it’s Elsa.

Mac Prichard:                     

Yeah. I think the Spider-Man versus Batman question, I wonder if that’s about chemistry, because if you talk to people who are fans of comics, they are firmly in one of two camps, either DC or Marvel, and usually the two don’t mix.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, and I think part of answering these questions well, it’s a strategy. Obviously, there’s not a definitive list of all these weird questions out there that you can just memorize rote responses to. The secret is kind of approaching some general rules about answering them. First is understand the company you’re interviewing with, both what they do and their culture. If you know they’re an investment firm, see all the questions through that frame. If you understand the culture, whether it’s a DC or Marvel house, for example, you can understand how they might want to hear your response.

Second is ask clarifying questions. You might want to ask, “I don’t know. Are you a Marvel fan or a DC Comics fan?” That response will give you some information you need to answer the question. Three is try to find the simplest and shortest possible answer. That’s almost always a good strategy in any kind of an interview question. Four is be creative, because when you’re getting quirky questions like this, a quirky response is probably appropriate. In addition to being creative, I think being humorous and having some levity with it is important. Five, as always, just stay calm. Part of the reason these questions are asked is to get you off balance a bit, but the more you can stay levelheaded, calm, and relaxed, the better it will reflect on you as the applicant.

Mac Prichard:

I think that’s excellent advice, and those are unusual questions. Thanks for sharing them.

Ben Forstag:                         

No problem. I’ll have a link to that blog in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:

Great. Thank you, Ben. If you have some oddball questions of your own you’d like to share with Ben or just any resource, whether it’s a podcast, website, or book, please write him. Ben’s e-mail address is ben@macslist.org.

Now let’s turn to you, our listeners. Cecilia is here to answer one of your questions. Cecilia, what are you hearing from the community this week?

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah. This week a reader asked, “What questions should I ask an employer in an interview?” This is a great question, something that many people forget to prepare for because we’re often a lot more worried about what they’re going to ask us. For when you’re preparing to ask certain questions, I like to split it into three categories. First, ask one or two questions that address the employer’s needs. This is the reason you’re in the interview, because they have a need, and so you want to make sure that you are addressing that.

An example of a question that you could ask is, “What skills and experiences make an ideal candidate?” If this is already answered, you can ask something along the lines of, “Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?” Mac, I know we’ve talked about how important it is to address the needs of the employer over talking about yourself and what you want out of the opportunity.

Mac Prichard:                     

Yeah. I think the more you as a candidate can think about how you can make life easier for the people sitting on the other side of the table that you’re interviewing with, the more successful you’ll be in the process.

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah, definitely. Number two, you want to ask at least one question that addresses the future of the company and the job opportunity itself. Asking something along the lines of, “What does success look like in this role?” will give you an idea of where the role is headed and what your opportunities for growth are going to be. You might also want to ask something about, “Can you tell me about your plans for growth, both with the company and in this position specifically?” These types of future questions will help you identify where the role is going and where the company is going and if it’s somewhere you want to be long term.

Then lastly, you want to ask one or two questions that pertain specifically to the company that will show that you’ve done some background research and you’re interested in what the company is all about. You can ask about a specific project that you saw that the company did online. Maybe ask what made it successful or questions about company values or culture from things you’ve read on their website or seen on their social media channels that really show you’ve delved in and you kind of understand what the company’s values are and just open that up to discussion. Doing this really allows you to show the employer why you’re going to fit into their company values and culture and why you’re a good fit for the role overall.

Mac and Ben, do you have any other basic questions you think are important?

Ben Forstag:

I would just add that when you’re asking these questions, it’s really a prompt for a conversation. You’re not flipping the table here and just asking a gauntlet of question after question. You’re asking a question and listening to the response and then catering your reply around that response. If the employer says, “Well, the big challenge we have here is X,” and that’s something new to you, you need to think on the fly and cater your response around what they just told you.

Mac Prichard:

I think the more you can make it a conversation, the more successful you’ll be in that interview. Two other quick thoughts about questions. One, I’ve heard someone say … This is always good advice about what not to do, which is never ask a question about something you could find online, something you could learn by Googling. To your earlier point, Cecilia, about doing research, looking at a company’s website and using that as a starting point, that’s always impressive. People like to know that you have done your homework, and if you can show them that, you’re going to have an advantage over other candidates.

My favorite question, it’s a takeoff on one you mentioned earlier, which is talk about what success looks like. I get very specific when I’m a candidate and I’ll ask someone, “If I’m fortunate enough to get the job and I’m doing an annual review with you in twelve months’ time, what are the three things you’ll want me to tell you I’ve accomplished for you?”

A couple of things happen when you ask that question. It takes it back into a conversation and puts you on almost the same footing as a peer with people you’re talking with, because now you’re talking about solving their problems. The other thing that happens is you often will learn about problems they have that they haven’t mentioned in the job posting or in the interview questions. That gives you an opportunity to do what Ben suggested, which is to cater to that employer and use that information as an opportunity to show how you might address the problem.

Ben Forstag:                         

The other great thing about that question is it gets them into the mindset that they’ve already hired you.

Mac Prichard:                     

Right. Yeah. Okay, well, thank you, Cecilia. If you have a question for Cecilia, her e-mail address is cecilia@macslist.org. We’d love to feature your question on the next episode.

These segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of “Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).” We’re making the complete Mac’s List Guide even better by adding new content and putting the book on multiple e-reader platforms. We’re going to launch a new version of the book in February, and for the first time, you’ll be able to access it on your Kindle, NOOK, iPad and other digital devices. You’ll also be able to get a paperback edition. Whatever the format, our goal is the same, to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. For more information, visit macslist.org/ebook and sign up for our e-book newsletter. We’ll send you publication updates, share exclusive book content, and even give you special presale prices.

Let’s turn to this week’s expert guest, Janet Brumbaugh. Janet has coached and recruited candidates for companies ranging from moms and pops’ operations to the Fortune 500. Janet also offers job-seekers coaching sessions and videotaped mock interviews. Prior to beginning her recruiting career, she was a teacher of both children and young adults challenged with emotional and learning difficulties.

Janet, thank you for joining us today.

Janet Brumbaugh:            

Oh, thank you.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. It’s a pleasure to have you here in the studio. Now as a recruiter, you’ve seen hundreds of people interview for jobs. Let’s start with the things you see candidates do that they shouldn’t do. What are some of the most common mistakes people make?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

I think one of the most common mistakes is that candidates forget what their audience is and who they’re addressing. We as people tend to focus on ourselves rather than the company and the individual that they’re interviewing with. When they create a context for, “I’m here to find out if I can be of help to this person,” then we can begin to look at all the details and what has to happen.

Mac Prichard:

Walk into the room thinking about what you can offer to the employer.

Janet Brumbaugh:            

Yes.

Mac Prichard:                     

Right. I think that’s such a good point, because I think sometimes people walk in almost as supplicants and they’re willing … Sometimes I worry that people are willing to do or say anything to get the job.

Janet Brumbaugh:            

Yes, and not really know what the other person needs and start to tell their life story before they even investigate who’s over there at the other end of the table.

Mac Prichard:                     

It’s important to find out what that employer needs. How do you see your candidates do that and how do they do that successfully?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

That’s a really spot-on question. I had a candidate who when we videotaped him … I do a lot of that for people so they can actually see themselves doing it. When he came in the room with me … because I actually start videotaping the minute they walk in the room … and then he sat down and I asked him, “Tell me about yourself,” he started to tell me his whole life story.

It took a while for him to get that he could actually guide the interview and have it go in a way that would benefit both parties by asking some really important questions like, “I’d love to tell you about myself, but first, I’d like to know a little bit more about the company and the challenges you find in this position so I make sure that I’m really addressing what you need.” His whole tone changed, his whole listening and demeanor, and he got the job.

Mac Prichard:                     

Make it a conversation and you’re not there to respond to questions. It’s not an interrogation. What kind of homework should people do before they walk into that room? because I agree. I think when I’ve sat in on interviews, interview panels, rather, or as an employer I’ve talked to candidates, I’m always impressed when it becomes a conversation. I think every employer expects people to have some preparation. What kind of homework is a must-do for a job candidate?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

That’s really very important, especially in today’s market. The irony is it looks like more people are being hired and there’s more jobs and salaries are higher. There’s also more competition to be excellent and to be better than just somebody showing up. Especially when the salaries are competitive, they’re going to want everything out of that person. You need to come prepared, knowing the person, knowing the company, bringing your electronic equipment with you whether it’s a pad or even handwritten so that you’ve researched the company and they can see visually that you’ve done that work. You’ve done your comparisons, you’ve done your research.

Mac Prichard:                     

What are the three basic things that people must know when they walk in?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

You must know who that person is. Again, I’m going to go back to human, the design of humans is that we think we’re separate from each other, but what if we weren’t? What if we weren’t separate, how would that conversation alter? If you go in that we’re connected and then you get to either know some information about that person and gain it while you’re there, it’s as if they were a friend or a relative, then you’re creating what I call the “we space” and you’re connecting with them, so knowing that person.

Knowing the company, knowing their history, knowing their financial position, what some of their challenges are, who their competitors are, and bonus, knowing who the people are, the key people in the company so that if you’re introduced to them, which you may very well be, you’re not like, “Well, who’s that?” You come with grounded information.

Mac Prichard:                     

I think you’re making an important point there about knowing who’s going to be in the room. I don’t think every candidate knows that when they make an appointment or they’re invited in for an interview, it’s perfectly acceptable to ask who will be on the interview committee so that you can do that research and prepare. Employers expect that question, and those who ask it I think have an advantage.

Janet Brumbaugh:

That’s a really good point.

Mac Prichard:                     

Yeah. Janet, I want to talk about mock interviews and videotape. I think those two words together probably terrify some of our listeners. What happens when you not only practice an interview, but you videotape it? What’s that dynamic like and how can people benefit from that experience?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

I’m going to share a little secret about you, Mac. I understand that you actually went through being videotaped at one point.

Mac Prichard:

I did. When I was in graduate school, I had someone at the career counseling center at the university suggested this, and it was painful for me personally. This was way back in the early ’90s when the technology was somewhat exotic. Then to have to sit there with a counselor and watch myself was hard. What I got from the experience was it helped me get comfortable in my own skin in thinking about answers and how others were going to see me.

What kind of experiences have you had, Janet, both personally and with your candidates?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

Yeah. I think that it is transformational for folks, because when they look at themselves, what they thought was so doesn’t always measure up to what they see. We all have blind spots. For instance, I worked with a particular individual who was interviewing for a government job, and in this government job you could not even deviate from the questions. You couldn’t say, “Could you repeat it?” It had to be the same format for each person so it showed no prejudice.

Within that compound, she could then look and see what could she bring. What we looked at is how was she being in the interview, which is something we don’t often step back to look at. What she saw in the past when she went for a promotion, a new job promotion, and she was turned down, she saw she was very solemn. That may seem like it made sense, but in reality, they had to visualize, they had to see her working with them.

In the next interview, after she saw herself and we went through it and we looked at it, she put up big Post-its all over the room, “Be happy,” “Lighten up,” “Smile.” In addition to that, she had to see that she was also nervous and acknowledge that. Not like slaphappiness over nervousness, be okay with being nervous and then go, “What am I going to create? What’s the context here?” She got the job.

Mac Prichard:                     

Oh, that’s a great story.

Janet Brumbaugh:

Promotion, yeah.

Mac Prichard:                     

For listeners who can’t work with a coach, do you recommend that they videotape themselves at home and watch that? What should they look for if they do that?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

Yes. That is another way you can do it. Have someone who probably isn’t going to trigger you. Often, a spouse can trigger you and go, “Oh, you always say that about me.” Someone who is a friend you trust and who will be there for you. You can videotape and start to look at some things about yourself like how are you sitting? How are you speaking? How are you listening? Are you talking more than half of the time? Are you finding out about that other person across the room?

One other case in point, I had a fellow who is now a CEO. What he looked at with our coaching together was that each time he left a job, he said he was fired. This guy had the opposite problem. He had to be too honest. The truth is, he wasn’t fired each time. He was laid off, but he had interpreted it as like, “I’m going to be straight. I was fired,” but he really wasn’t. He was laid off. Anyway, he’s now a CEO of a company in town.

Yes, there are things you can look at. How are you being? How are you acting? How are you asking? How’s your posture? Those are some of the tips.

Mac Prichard:

That’s great. In addition to what we see of ourselves when we look at those videos, as we play them back, I think another point that you’re making that’s so right on is the importance of getting outside perspective, because we’re telling a story about ourselves in those interviews. We think we’re being as accurate or as effective as possible, but by having a colleague or a trusted advisor look at that as well, they’re going to see things that we’ll never see about ourselves.

Janet Brumbaugh:

Yes.

Mac Prichard:                     

We’re coming to the close of our interview, but I want to touch on some common things, common questions we get at Mac’s List about interviews. Let’s talk about research. What are the five must things people should do, Janet, before they walk in the room? I know you talked about knowing who the people are, but are there other things that you always recommend your candidates do before they have an interview?

Janet Brumbaugh:

It’s knowing who’s across the table from you, knowing who that company is and their standing and their competitors, knowing the revenues of that company, knowing the challenges they face. Perhaps you even bringing to the table new challenges that they don’t bring up at that moment. Another thing knowing about that company is maybe talking to someone who used to work there and asking them what is their perspective on the company, what did they think worked, what didn’t work. That gives you more of an insider’s perspective.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. The message that’s coming through loud and clear in this conversation is the value of preparation. When you help candidates prepare for interviews or you see candidates do it on their own, what kind of results do you see typically?

Janet Brumbaugh:

We see typically that the candidates that work through us on the videotaping get the job that they’re going after. I take them through a process of really, if you were to sum it up, it’s be, have, do. Who are you being? Have it be that you are that person already, and then you actually do the things that person would do.

Mac Prichard:

After the interview is over, how should people follow up?

Janet Brumbaugh:

The follow-up is just as important as the entry. One of the challenges that people … Again, one of our blind spots, we don’t necessarily see what we don’t see, is that we follow up in a sense of too much follow-up. I’m taking a case in point where an individual kept following up with her client and to the point where it looked like she was not going to let go and then she didn’t get the job. It’s appropriate to follow up and it’s appropriate not to say, “How come you haven’t responded to me?” but it’s appropriate to be gracious and thankful. I also still, old fashioned, recommend in addition to an e-mail, a personally handwritten note to that person and everyone that you touched.

Mac Prichard:

Great. We’re going to wrap up here now, Janet, but what’s coming up for you next? What’s on the horizon for Janet Brumbaugh and Associates?

Janet Brumbaugh:            

What’s coming up next is preparing to write a book about the different experiences people have had actually going through the process as well as leading online classes.

Mac Prichard:

People can find Janet at her website, which is janetbrumbaugh.com. She’s also on LinkedIn. We’ll be sure to include links to both sites in the show notes. Janet, thank you for joining us.

Janet Brumbaugh:

Thank you.

Mac Prichard:

All right, let’s check in with the Mac’s List team. Cecilia, Ben, are you ready to volunteer to have your next job interview videotaped and then watch it?

Ben Forstag:

I’m not sure about that. It’s tough enough for me to listen to these podcasts and hear my own voice. I’m not sure I’m going to watch myself being interviewed. That would be pretty tough.

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah. I definitely think that’s a really hard thing to do, but she made a lot of good points about why it’s beneficial and how it will really help you bring yourself up in an interview and do a lot better.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. I will say it’s hard to experience being videotaped and even harder to go back and watch, but there are benefits. I encourage people to consider doing it, and not only do it alone but work with a colleague or a friend or even a career coach and getting the feedback that will help you do an even better job in your next interview.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah. Success in an interview sounds like it’s a combination of so many tiny little things, from your posture to your facial expression to your attitude. It’s not just about the responses to questions and videotaping yourself and watching yourself. It gives you clues on where you can improve and what you’re doing wrong.

Mac Prichard:

Agreed. Thank you for listening. We’ll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. In the meantime, visit us at macslist.org where you can sign up for our free newsletters with more than a hundred new jobs every week. If you like what you hear on the show, please help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This helps other people discover the show and this helps us help more job-seekers. Thanks for listening.

“Wing it” and “job interview” are two phrases that should never go together in the same sentence. If you want to ace a job interview, you need to prepare yourself, do your homework, and practice what you will do and say.

But how do you prepare responses when you don’t know the questions? And what, besides having good answers, contributes to a successful interview?

This week’s guest, Janet Brumbaugh, coaches job seekers on how to ace a job interview. Her clients hone their interview skills by video-recording themselves in mock-interviews; Janet then reviews the tape with the jobseeker, to identify mistakes and opportunities for improvement.

In this episode, Janet shares her expert advice on how to improve your own interview performance and outcomes.

This Week’s Guest

Janet Brumbaugh has coached and recruited candidates for hundreds of companies–from moms and pop operations to the Fortune 500. Janet also offers job-seekers coaching sessions and videotaped mock interviews. Prior to beginning her recruiting career, she was a teacher of both children and young adults challenged with emotional and learning difficulties.

Resources from this Episode