How to Make (and Keep) Professional Resolutions, with Victoria Crispo

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Transcript

Mac Prichard:  

This is “Find your Dream Job,” the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of “Mac’s List.” Our show is brought to you by Mac’s List and by our book, “Land your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond.” To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we’re publishing in February, on February 1st, actually, visit MacsList.org/ebook.

A new year means a new start, and as 2016 beings, you’re probably making resolutions to something different in your career. The list of changes you want to see in the next 12 months may include a raise, a promotion, and a new job, or maybe you want to improve your professional skills by stepping up your networking, increasing your industry knowledge, or adopting new work habits. Whatever your goal, you’re not alone. More than 40% of Americans make New Years resolutions, according to some estimates.

In spite of those good intentions, however, most of us don’t have much success in keeping our promises to ourselves. Researchers at the University of Scranton found that only 8% of Americans achieve their goals. This week on “Find your Dream Job,” we’re talking about resolutions, why most of them fail, and why those that stick work. We’re recording this in January, but the issues that we’re talking about and the information we’ll share with you today you can use in any month.

Our guest expert this week is Victoria Crispo, who will tell us what people who are successful at keeping their resolutions do differently. Cecilia Bianco, our community manager, has advice about what to do if you’re thinking about this is the year that you move to a new town. Ben Forstag, our managing director, has 2 blog posts you can use to make difficult career decisions.

All right, Cecilia, Ben, let’s talk about your New Years resolutions before we move onto our guest expert and our resources this week. What’s on your list?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Well, for me, I try to make my resolutions based on something I learned in the previous year. Last year, I learned that if I don’t keep up with having all my work organized, then I kind of start to fall apart. In the coming year, I want to make a huge effort to stay organized throughout the entire year.

Ben Forstag:    

For me, I want to be better about getting out there networking on a regular basis, going to industry events, and just social mixers here in town, just so I can meet other professionals in Portland and in other areas. In the past, I’ve always done that sporadically, and my goal now is to set a regular schedule, a modest schedule, maybe once or twice a month, but have a schedule and go do that consistently.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. For me, I’ve found in the past that I have the most success when I just focus on just one or two things, so one of my resolutions last year was to publish the Mac’s List book. We brought that out as a PDF this year. The 3 of us have talked about the new e-course that we hope to introduce in the second half of the year, and that’s on my to-do list.

I’m curious, before we move on, are there tips that you have for our listeners about once you make those resolutions, the things you do that you find make it more likely that they’ll happen?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I find that if I set aside time on my calendar to actually meet that goal, then I’ll end up doing it. Setting a weekly reminder on Fridays, or something like that, “It’s time to get organized,” will keep me on track.

Mac Prichard:   

I’m also impressed, Cecilia, we share our calendars as a team, when I see that you blocked out time on your calendar to do certain tasks. That prevents the rest of us from interrupting you by scheduling meetings or appointments.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, it helps.

Ben Forstag:   

I think for me it’s about setting realizable goals for yourself. There’s always this inclination, when you set a resolution, to say, like, “I’m going to go from not running ever to running a marathon this year.” That’s a nice audacious goal, but sometimes it’s just too much. It’s really hard to reach that goal. The moment you find that you’re not on the right step in the progress, you just give up. I would say for me, my goal is not to go to a networking each week. It’s once a month, right. It’s a modest goal. I can do it. It’s achievable, and if I can do that for the next 6 months, then maybe I can adjust my plan and say, “It will be twice a month, now, or 3 times a month, or once every week.” Just setting realistic goals that you know you can hit, but that are going to create a real effective change in your life.

Mac Prichard:   

Keep it realistic. Put it on your calendar, and those are ways you can make it happen. Speaking of resources, let’s turn to Ben, who is out there all the time looking for tools you can use. What have you found for us this week, Ben?

Ben Forstag:  

This week, we’re talking about career resolutions. Resolutions, as you know, often involve some kind of change, taking a new job position, going back to school, confronting your professional challenges, and things like that. Change can be scary, right? Especially if we’re talking about taking a step into the unknown, something that you’re unfamiliar with, taking that new job, where it’s a big question mark of what it’s really going to be like. This week, I’m sharing 2 blog posts that I’ve found that can help you manage your fears and make the right career decisions, the right career decisions for yourself, that is. The first post is from the Life Hack blog, and it’s titled, “10 Questions You Should Ask When Facing a Tough Career Decision.” The author provides some good, high-level questions you should think about whenever your career is at a fork in the road. I’m going to kind of cover this broadly, here. It’s a post I’d suggest you go through and read because the author does go into each of these questions in detail. In general, his questions are:

  1. Are you willing to learn new things?
  2. Will you learn about yourself?
  3. Does this new opportunity scare you?
  4. Does a new opportunity change the way you think about success? For example, have you been thinking about success solely in terms of money, and then this new opportunity re-frames success as fulfillment, social good, or something like that?
  5. Does it excite you to talk about it?
  6. Does it affect people in your life, and how does it affect them?
  7. Is it fiscally responsible?
  8. Does it elevate your skills? In other words, how does this position position you for future career choices you have to make? Is it an advancement in skills and opportunities, or is it stepping back?
  9. Is it in line with your brand?
  10. Does it provide value? In other words, does it solve major problems or improve the quality of life?

Simply, these aren’t clear yes-no questions. This is not the cheat sheet for making decisions in your life. These are really more open prompts. They get you thinking about the full impact, cost, and benefits of a prospective change. I love how each question frames the decision-making process around your own needs as a professional. I’d really suggest you check that out. Again, it’s, “10 Question You Should Ask When Facing a Tough Career Decision,” and it’s in the Life Hack blog. I’ll have the URL to that in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:   

That’s a great list. One thought that occurred to me as you were talking, Ben, is a question I saw posed on a different blog, which is: When you think about how you want to be known professionally, whether it’s as a manager, speaker, or a writer, ask yourself: How are you spending your time doing those things, and does your calendar reflect that? If it doesn’t, then something’s out of whack.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah. I think these questions are kind of the micro way of getting at that general, big question in there because I think sometimes that’s a little bit too big of a thing to figure out or to put into your mind. This really gets at that. I particularly like the question about, “Does it fit with your brand?” That’s just a fancy way of saying, “Does this fit with who you see yourself as and who you want to be as a professional?” Sometimes, people make decisions that don’t fit with their brand. I think, at the long run, that’s typically a bad decision. It’s something you want to think about when you’re making that big career change, whatever kind of change that is.

The other blog post I want to share is from the Muse. It’s called, “The Scientifically-Proven Way to Overcome Your Career Fears.” I’ll admit, this title is a little bit click-baity, but I think the content in here is really good. We can excuse that title. We all know that sometimes fear immobilizes us and makes it almost impossible to make a good career decision. I know this has been true for myself in the past. I was once in a job that I was miserable at. Every day was painful to go to work. I didn’t like it here at all. I didn’t leave because I had this voice in my head that says, “What happens if you leave? You’ll never get another job. You’ll be destitute on the street.” That’s all just crazy talk in your head. (laughter)

Mac Prichard:   

I think we’ve all had that, that vision.

Ben Forstag:   

So we’re all a little crazy, right?

Mac Prichard:   

Mine involves sleeping in a cardboard box.

Ben Forstag:

Okay, well maybe we can be neighbors, when we meet. I like this blog because it shares some tips on how you can overcome that knee-jerk fear reaction that you have, which is often not based in anything real. The author borrows from some controlled exposure strategies that psychologists use to treat other fears, like the fear of flying, or arachnophobia. Basically, it’s a 3-step process.

1: Analyzing the fear, figuring out where that fear comes from, what it’s costing you, how it manifests, and so forth.

2: Creating a plan to slowly expose yourself to that fearful situation so that you can give yourself a little leeway and test the waters without jumping right into something that you find scary.

Then, 3: Executing on that plan in a meaningful way.

I also like that the examples the author uses here about fears in a workplace situation. It’s not just about switching jobs, which is a great unknown out there, but also about issues like how to confront a boss that you have issues with, which can be a very scary situation, or the fear of meeting personal professional expectations, which is one I, frankly, struggle with. Again, that blog is, “The Scientifically-Proven Way to Overcome Your Career Fears.” It’s on the Muse blog. Again, the link will be in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:   

Thank you, Ben. If you’ve got a suggestion for Ben, please let us hear from you. You can write him to his email address. It’s ben@macslist.org.

Let’s turn to our inbox, the high-tech mailbag, and hear from you, our listeners. Cecilia joins us to answer one of your questions. Cecilia, what are you hearing from listeners this week?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, this week our questions is, “Should people who want to relocate move before they have a new job lined up?” That’s a great question. I don’t necessarily think there’s a general yes or no to this question. It really just depends on your circumstances and how much of a risk it’s going to be for you to relocate without first having a source of income. That being said, I do think it’s easier to get a job once you’re in the city that you want to work in. If you’re able to relocate without taking a huge financial or personal risk, I would probably suggest it. Ben and Mac, you’ve both relocated more than once. Did you move before you had a job?

Ben Forstag:   

Well, I’ve done both. Back in the early aughts, I was living in Spain. My visa in Spain ran out. I had to move back to the States and didn’t have time to find a job beforehand. Without a job, I moved to Washington D.C., somehow convinced an apartment building to let me move in without any provable income. It took me a while to find a job there. It was scary, but in that situation, I didn’t really have many other choices, so I did that.

When I moved to Portland, I actually got a job lined up before I moved out here. I think that was a unique situation, though, because first, it’s pretty rare, but second, I had a very strong case to make that I was moving to Portland whether I had a job or not. I think that reassured the employer that this wasn’t just some flighty application. In the case of moving to Portland, I said, “My wife and I already have plans to move to Oregon. Here’s the move date. We’ve already lined up housing and everything else.” The employer knew that I was a real candidate. I wasn’t just someone from Washington D.C. applying for a job.

Mac Prichard:

I’ve been lucky enough to have a job to each city I’ve moved to for the first time, Washington D.C., Boston, and Portland. I will say when I went to D.C., I had just graduated college and was coming off a political campaign. I had a promise of a job for 4 weeks, and it turned out, once I got there, I stayed at that position for 2 years. I didn’t think twice about getting on the Greyhound bus from the Midwest, and I think it was just youthful optimism, not something I’d recommend to everybody.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah. It sounds like good experience. I do want to mention that while it is probably easier to find something once you’ve moved, we’ve actually heard plenty of success stories from people who have moved before having a job. We actually just published a post featuring a woman who found a job within a week of moving because of the preparation she did beforehand. If you don’t have a job, but you want to move anyway, there are things you can do, like she did, to make it a smoother transition. Doing research on local organizations that you want to work for and getting connected to people who currently work there, that’s a great way to start. You can also use social media as a tool to get a pulse on the local job market. On Twitter, it’s always worth checking for a hashtag that covers what jobs are available. Then, Facebook and LinkedIn, there are tons of job groups in each city that you can join. You can also follow local companies, which often post if they’re hiring on those 2 sites.

One more note: I think if I was planning to relocate, I would probably reach out to recruiting agencies in the town I wanted to live in because they’re always looking for talent. They can really help you make the connections you need to before you move. Any other thoughts or suggestions?

Ben Forstag:  

I have a question for you. In the past, when I’ve applied for a job when I was out of state, I’ve thought, “Well, if only I had like a P.O. box that said ‘Portland’ on it when I applied to this Portland-based job.” Do you think there’s any value in that, or is that just disingenuous?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I don’t think it’s a good idea to make that up. I think that there’s little things you can do, like changing your location online. On LinkedIn, if you change your city, that’s a great thing to do. If employers are looking, they’ll see, not that you’re in that city necessarily, but if they’re looking to hire in that city, if you’re there, they can find you.

Ben Forstag:      

You’ve publicly committed to moving to that city.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Right, right.

Mac Prichard: 

I like your suggestion, Cecilia, about connecting with a temporary agency because not only can you make good connections that could lead to a permanent position, but if you do come to a town and you don’t have a job there, that’s a way of getting work right away, beginning to meet people, and make those connections that you can’t do from afar.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah. I think that’s really important. The quickest way to find a job is through people you know, so doing what you can to make those personal connections in advance is the best thing.

Ben Forstag:    

I’d just throw out there as well that, from what I know about employers and how they work, if they think you’re the right person and you’re going to solve their problems, they will wait for a couple weeks or a month until you are able to relocate to the town for them. Obviously, the location differences create a barrier, but it’s not an insurmountable barrier. It puts just a little more onus on the job seeker to prove that they are the absolute, unique, right match for that position.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, definitely.

Mac Prichard:   

Thanks for that great information, Cecilia. If you have a question for Cecilia, please email her. Her address is cecilia@macslist.org .

These segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of “Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond.” We’re making the complete Mac’s List guide even better. We’re adding new content and publishing the book on different e-reader platforms. On February 1st of this year, 2016, you’ll be able to access for the first time “Land Your Dream Job in Portland” on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, and other digital devices. You’ll also be able to get, for the first time, a paperback edition. Whatever the format, our goal is the same: to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. For more information, visit macslist.org/ebook and sign up for our e-book newsletter. Once you do, we’ll send you publication updates and share exclusive book content, as well as provide you with special pre-sale prices. We’re recording this in mid-January. We encourage you to get out there soon because there are great deals coming.

Now, let’s turn this week’s guest expert, Victoria Crispo. Victoria Crispo is manager of career content at Idealist Careers and author of the “Ask Victoria” advice column, where she answers questions for social change job seekers and career changers. Before joining Idealist.org, Victoria helped non-profit job seekers as a resume writer, career coach, and in higher education. Victoria, thanks for joining us today.

Victoria Crispo:  

Thank you so much for having me, Mac. Great to be here.

Mac Prichard:

It’s a pleasure to have you on the show. We’re recording in January, and a topic that is on many people’s minds are resolutions for the new year. It’s also a subject that I think has relevance throughout the year. Let’s talk about New Years resolutions, Victoria, and let’s go straight to the dark side. Why don’t most New Years resolutions work for job seekers, career managers, and just people in general?

Victoria Crispo:  

Sure. I think that there are a couple of important points to keep in mind, actually even before you even start to make the resolution, which will then cause it to be a lot easier to keep. One of those aspects that I think can really help is making sure that the goal that you craft, the resolution that you’re trying to achieve, is something that is very specific and also measurable. The measurable piece is important because you want to be able to have a way to know that you’re progress and that you are actually making change and seeing improvement. That’s definitely one area that is really important as you think about not just keeping your resolution, but the first part is how to create a resolution that you will be able to keep and the other things that are involved in that.

Mac Prichard:  

Let’s unpack that for our listeners, because I imagine many people are thinking, “Okay. This is the year I want to get a new job.” They write that down. How do they make that measurable and specific, Victoria?

Victoria Crispo:   

Actually, almost just what you said, unpack it a little bit. What are the other details that are going to be involved in getting that job? That might require doing a little bit of research and reflection. First, figuring out what type of job do you want? Beyond that, what are the things that you need in order to get that job? It might involve taking a look at job descriptions that relate to that type of work. What are the responsibilities that are involved? Have you done that type of work before? What are the skills that are necessary? Do you have those skills, or do you have other ones that might be able to serve as a supplement?

In regards to having something that’s measurable, it might require having some additional steps before you get to that main resolution of, “I want a new job for 2016.” For example, if you see a job description that you’re really interested in, and there is a requirement for a certain skill, whether it’s computer skills, social media management, whatever it might be, if it’s a skill that you don’t have, start thinking about what is it that you need to do to get yourself on track and make sure that the resolution that you’ve developed for yourself is something that you can actually achieve in the time frame that you’ve given yourself.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay. Define what that job is, find out what the typical title might be, look for examples of specific job postings that you might see online on job boards or elsewhere, then identify the skills that are required to do that work, and think about the gaps that you might have than employer might see and how you might address those gaps.

Victoria Crispo:   

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay. You need to be clear about what you want. What are some of the other steps that people need to take in setting these career resolutions?

Victoria Crispo:    

Absolutely. Be clear about what you want and the steps that you may not have thought about beforehand that you’ll need to get there. I think it’s definitely helpful to build in smaller tasks along the way, things that you can use as milestones, reasons for celebration. You are your best judge as to what that means for you. I can certainly give some examples, but it might be gaining entry into a specific area by volunteering and maybe developing a really great relationship with your volunteer manager, which perhaps then leads to an informational interview with someone else, who can take you to the next step. Having a good idea of what success might look like and also knowing that it might not be the exact picture of what you might think, and how to really determine that you are staying on track. Developing some little, smaller tasks that kind of show you that green light of, “Yes. I’m on the right path. I’m getting someplace,” are things that you can celebrate, those little, the small victories that you can celebrate and feel good that you’re getting to where you want to go.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. Baby steps can pay off. As you move forward, even though it might be in an incremental way, you’ll see the progress. Reading your blog before the show, I know you’ve talked a lot about the importance and the value of having accountability partners. Tell us about the difference an accountability partner can make in setting these kinds of resolutions or in job hunting in general.

Victoria Crispo: 

I know, for myself personally, I love having someone who I can speak to about the things that I’m looking to do, and someone who is giving me that metaphorical tap on the shoulder of, “Oh, hey. Did you … ? How are things going with x, y, z?” It is so, so helpful to have someone there in your corner who is able to just be a person who you can check in with and help you evaluate whether you’re still on-task. Of course, it doesn’t mean that you’re going to necessarily take a lot of time out from this other individual. It can be very quick emails. Let’s say you, as well, are a writer, and one of your goals is to develop a personal/professional portfolio that showcases the type of work that you do. You might, for example, share a link with your accountability partner.

It can be a very informal, yet scheduled arrangement, where maybe you check in once a week or once every other week, but that there is someone there who can attest to, “Yes. You said you were going to do x, y, z, and you did it.” I have definitely found that to be helpful in the past. In fact, there are sites that exist, I don’t know if you’re familiar with Stikk.com?

Mac Prichard:   

No. Tell us about that.

Victoria Crispo:  

Sure. It’s actually Stikk with two k’s. It is a way for individuals to set a goal, set the time that they are expecting to complete that goal, and they can set up a referee. That would be, in essence, you accountability partner. If you like, you can also have financial stakes in the game for when you accomplish your goal. I believe it’s set up so that you can have that money go to a charity, the charity of your choice. You can also do the opposite, so if you miss your goal, you can have it sent to a charity that you really don’t want to support. Therein lies and even deeper blow. (laughs)

Mac Prichard:   

All right. Well, that can be motivating.

Victoria Crispo:  

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard: 

Yeah. I’ve certainly had good experience with accountability partners. I remember during one job search, there was a friend I would call. This was a long time ago because we were still looking at newspaper classified ads. When the Sunday paper came out, we would call each other and say, “Okay. I saw this position. I saw that position. I’m going to apply for this one or that one.” Just that weekly call was very affirming, and it was nice to have that connection. I’m sure you’ve had this experience too. I’ve had colleagues who’ve had good success with job support groups, groups of people who meet together to just keep each other updated on their progress, but also to set goals and exchange tips and other information.

Victoria Crispo:   

Definitely. It’s so helpful to have that. I know there are some local job search support groups around here that have been really beneficial for the members. If there’s not an in-person group in your area, there may be one online that you can join. That, too, can be effective, if it’s a place where you can check in via email or in an online group. I definitely recommend that, as well.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay. Let’s talk about mistakes you see people make that they should avoid when setting New Years resolutions for their careers. What stands out for you, Victoria?

Victoria Crispo:

I think the main things that stand out are again, not really doing that leg work beforehand of really discovering whether it’s something that you can achieve in the time frame that you’ve given yourself. In some cases, it might be that there are, again, additional steps that you need to take in order to get to where you want to see yourself next. I think that that is definitely one of the bigger quote mistakes that I see, is not really factoring in some of the other things that might come into play as you’re doing the work. I think the other mistake is, while it’s great to have a goal, definitely building in some leeway for yourself and not beating yourself up too hard if you don’t in fact make it by your set time. Job search is only one part of life. In fact, it’s all of the other aspects of living.

If you look at it in a holistic way, all of the other things that affect life, your relationships, your health, et cetera, do have a place in what happens in your job search as well. Sometimes, the drawback that a job seeker may have when they’re trying to meet a resolution that they’ve set for themselves is forgetting those other aspects that come into play and that sometimes you may need to account for unexpected things that come up in life. Just because you haven’t necessarily met your goal exactly doesn’t mean that you haven’t gone any distance whatsoever. I think that seeing those changes and improvements in your life, even if you haven’t necessarily gone exactly where you expected to be is something that should be considered, too.

Mac Prichard:   

In summary, be specific, break your tasks down into small, manageable pieces, and be kind to yourself. Realize that you’re not going to get it done in one day or one month, but you will make progress if you’re focused, over the course of a year.

Victoria Crispo: 

Definitely.

Mac Prichard:   

Victoria, what’s coming up next for you and your organization, Idealist.org?

Victoria Crispo:                 

Sure. Next month, we will be running an email-based course called find your fit. I definitely encourage anyone who might be interested in exploring their passions and figuring out where they want to go next professionally to sign up. It is a free course, and we will be making the announcement on our site, IdealistCareers.org, and also, of course, on our email list, which you can subscribe to on IdealistCareers.org.

Mac Prichard:  

Thank you, Victoria, and it’s been a pleasure having you on the show.

Victoria Crispo:

Thank you very much, Mac. It’s been great talking with you.

Mac Prichard:   

To learn more about Idealist, there are 2 great web pages you can explore. The first one is IdealistCareers.org, that’s all one word. IdealistCareers.org. When you go there, you’ll find career resources and tools. Idealist has a wonderful job board with, actually, thousands of listings. You can find those at Idealist.org. Victoria is on Twitter, and her Twitter handle is @AskVictoria. We’ll be sure to put all of these links in the show notes.

We’re back in the Mac’s List studio. I’m sitting here with Ben and Cecilia. What did you 2 think of the conversation with Victoria? What were some of the key takeaways for you?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Well, the main takeaway I got, I really like her point about breaking down your goal into steps so you can really determine if it’s unrealistic or realistic for you to achieve that goal, and then edit it from there.

Ben Forstag:  

I thought her point about accountability partners was so important, not only so that you’ve got someone providing some oversight for you and making sure you’re staying true to yourself and your goals, but also just so you’re not doing this by yourself, right? Sometimes you need another person to share your frustrations or your triumphs with. I think having an accountability partner like that is a great idea.

Mac Prichard:  

I agree. One of the things that I think is surprising to many job seekers, particularly people who have been unemployed for a while, and I certainly have been there. I’ve gone through 2 long periods of unemployment, is in my case, I’d began to think I didn’t have a lot to offer. We all have a lot to offer. We all have lots of experiences and skills, and helping somebody else by being that accountability partner is one of the most important things I think we can do.

Okay. Well, thank you all for joining us and holding us accountable to our weekly production schedule. We’ll be back next Wednesday with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. In the meantime, please visit us at MacsList.org, and you can sign up for our free newsletter there. It’s published every Tuesday, with more than a hundred new jobs every week.

If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. I’ve recently read that more than 80% of podcast listeners find shows on iTunes. By leaving a rating and review, you help us rise in the iTunes rankings, get in front of more job seekers, and help more people. Thanks for your help, and thanks for listening.

Did you make a New Year’s professional resolution to do something different in your career?

The list of changes you seek in the next 12 months could include a raise, a promotion, or a new job. Or maybe you want to improve your professional skills by stepping up your networking, increasing your industry knowledge, or adopting new work habits.

Whatever your goal, you’re not alone. More than 40% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions, according to some estimates. (Alas, research suggests only about 8% of people stick to those resolutions.)

So what are you doing to ensure your professional resolutions turn into a reality?

This week’s guest, Victoria Crispo, is a career development expert and manager of career content at Idealist. Victoria shares her advice on how to set and attain achievable career goals so that 2016 is a year you move closer to your dream job.

This Week’s Guest

Victoria Crispo is manager of career content at Idealist Careers and author of the “Ask Victoria” advice column, where she answers questions for social change job seekers and career changers. Before joining Idealist.org, Victoria helped non-profit job seekers as a resume writer, career coach, and in higher education.

Resources from this Episode